See and “D”

Originally posted 2012-04-23 18:48:44. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

A hard stop.

The “D” as in “Defense.”  The put-upon pun is on “C & D,” which is what we pros call a cease and desist letter.

As I’ve noted before, sometimes a bad C & D is worse than none at all.  Sometimes they are nasty and silly.

Other times they are — protected by copyright?  That can’t be right.

In any event, they aren’t really, as some would have it, ways to “open a dialogue” — unless that’s what you visualize when you send them.

As Aaron Thalwitzer notes in this post on the Tactical IP blog, there is some virtue to giving thought to the pluses and minuses of uttering a C & D.

Beforehand, that is.

email

Tags:

Author:Ron Coleman

I write this blog.

Subscribe

There are all kinds of social media formats to subscribe or otherwise follow the adventures of LIKELIHOOD OF CONFUSION®. Or see the posts-by-email option below.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Sebastian Gonzalez - April 23, 2012

    Thinking about cease and desist letters — before you send them http://t.co/chA0b3fN | LIKELIHOOD OF CONFUSION®

  2. CardozoJCR - April 23, 2012

    Thinking about cease and desist letters — before you send them http://t.co/chA0b3fN | LIKELIHOOD OF CONFUSION®

  3. CardozoJCR - April 23, 2012

    @RonColeman has some great thoughts on cease & desist letters http://t.co/7cSdEKsy in IP. Think about them as a step in #negotiation.

  4. The Br@nd Ranch - April 24, 2012

    RT @roncoleman: See and "D" – http://t.co/F4n7KSMx

  5. Hacker Scouts? Yeah, Hacker Scouts! | LIKELIHOOD OF CONFUSION® - August 20, 2013

    […] would love to see that cease and desist letter, because that’s going to be where the really soft spots are – as with all phony-baloney threats.  In particular, I’d like to see exactly what […]

Leave a Reply