See and “D”

A hard stop.

The “D” as in “Defense.”  The put-upon pun is on “C & D,” which is what we pros call a cease and desist letter.

As I’ve noted before, sometimes a bad C & D is worse than none at all.  Sometimes they are nasty and silly.

Other times they are — protected by copyright?  That can’t be right.

In any event, they aren’t really, as some would have it, ways to “open a dialogue” — unless that’s what you visualize when you send them.

As Aaron Thalwitzer notes in this post on the Tactical IP blog, there is some virtue to giving thought to the pluses and minuses of uttering a C & D.

Beforehand, that is.

Ron Coleman

I write this blog.