Everything you ever wanted to know about lawyers*

* Yeah, but were afraid to ask.

It’s a series of very basic introductions to the work that I do, because people are always asking me.

Here is a sample.

4 comments

  • Joseph Andrade

    Ron, I was if there is any instance in which defendants can file more than one motion to dismiss, in District Court? I am a pro se plaintiff (middle district court of Louisiana) due to the lack of special education attorneys here in Louisiana. The defense filed a motion to dismiss but only as it pertained to two of the parties, I responded with my opposition to motion to dismiss. The defense replied with a brief and on the same day filed another motion to dismiss as it pertained to all of the parties. Basically using the same arguments. Is that allowed in federal court? Thank you. Any advice I will only consider advice and will greatly appreciate it.

  • Joseph, there is no technical prohibition on proceeding that way, but it is sure a way to annoy a judge whether in state or federal court. Most federal judges enter scheduling orders that set specific dates for when dispositive motions (such as motions to dismiss or summary judgment) can be made. That means one motion, not the kind of procedure you describe.

  • Joseph Andrade

    Thank you very much. Read up on everything in the FRCP and realized Defendants erred in not requesting leave or seeking my permission prior to filing. Filed motion for leave to file surreply brief and requested Court Strike second MTD. We shall see

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